Interview by Evan Faber

Brands with Moxie Sozo
008 Circle Up

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Join our conversation with Aditi Dash to learn how Circle Up is disrupting private investing with their proprietary machine learning platform, Helio, and the ways this intel is being supported by human insights to spin their portfolio of brands into the ultimate power position: the flywheel.

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Evan Faber
Hello, my name is Evan Faber. I am the CEO and Chief Strategist at Moxie Sozo. I’m joined today by Catherine Walsh, our Vice President of Business Development, and Aditi Dash, partner at Circle Up Growth Partners. Welcome to the show.

Catherine Walsh
Hi, Aditi!

Aditi Dash
Hi, thank you guys for having me. I’m so excited to be here.

Catherine Walsh
We are excited to have you here. Thank you for coming on Brands with Moxie Sozo. Moxie and Circle Up, we’ve partnered over the years co-hosting events at trade shows, I think the last time I saw you was at Winter Fancy Food. We’ve had clients that have worked with you and spoken with you, and you’ve had clients that have spoken with us. So there’s a little bit of overlap there. What we want to go into now is talk about Circle Up, because you have different parts of your business. And if you could explain them, that would be great.

Aditi Dash
Circle Up is an asset manager. We are a company that has two funds. We have an equity fund and a credit fund. I’m one of the five partners on the equity side. What we do on the equity fund, is that we invest in high-growth companies (consumer brands only) and we invest anywhere from one to five million dollars in growing consumer brands. We’re constantly looking for exciting trends and founders to invest behind. On the credit side, we do work in capital loans and lending directly to consumer brands. Everything that we do here at Circle Up, both on the equity side and the credit side, is tied together with data. That’s where our data platform Helio comes in. It is a proprietary platform that we use to find investments, support companies, and really think about the world in a differentiated way when it comes to investing in consumer.

Catherine Walsh
When you say high growth on the equity side, what kind of growth are you guys looking at? What’s your sweet spot?

Aditi Dash
High growth means a lot of different things. For us on the equity side, it means companies that are at least doubling year over year from a sales perspective.

Catherine Walsh
You mentioned Helio, which is such a unique thing to Circle Up. If you could talk more about that. Evan and I were fortunate enough to get a whole presentation on Helio. It was so fascinating. Talk about it a little bit more, tell people what it’s all about and what you’re building.

Aditi Dash
Helio is really a big part of the reason that I’m here at Circle Up. It is Circle Up’s, proprietary machine learning platform. And what we do with it, is that we use it to identify, classify and evaluate brands that are in the consumer and retail space. So we have been tracking millions of data points on millions of brands over over the years, ever since Circle Up was founded. It’s really helpful in figuring out what trends are starting to resonate. It’s helpful in figuring out interesting brands, interesting products that are emerging. We use it all the time on a day-to-day basis to really think about where we want to invest the capital in the world of consumer, which we can all see is getting increasingly crowded.

Catherine Walsh
I know you’ve been collecting this data for some time, have you made an investment solely off of the data that’s come out of Helio, yet?

Aditi Dash
Yeah, we definitely have. Almost all of our investments at Circle Up are supported by Helio. So we’re using it often to find brands. And it’s often the reason that we even reach out to a company. I think Liquid IV is probably the best example of investment that led to a recent exit. So that’s a company where we use the data to see what was resonating, we made the investments, and it was really exciting to see that come to exit as well.

Catherine Walsh
Well, congratulations. That was your first acquisition, is that right?

Aditi Dash
Yeah, it’s the first one. And it’s pretty exciting for our fund. So thank you so much.

Catherine Walsh
Yeah, of course. I think over the years, I’ve heard investors talk about, well, I’m investing in the entrepreneur, or I’m investing in this category…there’s no data because the category is too new. I feel as though Helio is a departure from that, in a way, because it is so data-heavy. And I’m wondering, how is the interaction between the human element of investing, versus the data component, which both are valuable, right? But sometimes, maybe you have to override the data, right? If you can look at a situation and say, well, I don’t have enough data and this is too new of a category. At what point can the human element come in and override the data component?

Aditi Dash
Yeah, I think that the human element is really, really helpful when a company is creating a category. So when there’s a business or a founder that’s creating something new in a category that doesn’t really exist, that’s when we have to think about the importance of the problem that it’s solving. But the data for Circle Up, to this point anyway, has always been a supporting angle. So we think about things that we’re interested in, we think about what’s resonating. And the best investments are ones where there is that layer of additional thought put behind what problem is this solving for the consumer, because at the end of the day, if a company or brand isn’t solving a problem, then it’s going to be a tougher exit. It’s going to be tougher to scale. And it’s going to be tougher to articulate that vision. So until the data can get to a point, until the machine learning can get to a point where it’s able to see a spike, see something like Instagram traffic or see something like distribution growth, and turn that into a clear and concise thesis of what problem is this solving for the people, the planet, until that point, I think that it’s going to be an interaction of data plus human. And then also I’m a human, so I’m always going to be more about bringing that human lens into it. But ultimately, one day, yes, data is going to disrupt private investing, if it hasn’t already. And I think that having that interaction, the way that I think about it, is that it makes me smarter. So what can make me smarter is where that’s where I want to learn. That’s what I want to do. So I don’t think that it’s a perfect scenario, some companies will be 50% data driven, some will be 80%, data driven, some will be 10%, data driven, depending on the specific situation. But I think every fund and investor needs to be thinking about data in a way that helps articulate that thesis better.

Catherine Walsh
Can your portfolio companies get a little bit of that data from Helio to help them out on product innovation?

Aditi Dash
I think that’s a big part of the vision. And that’s a big part of why I’m here too, is using the data to help brands and founders do better. I have first-hand experience working at a brand and trying to just stick my finger in the air and figure out what’s going to resonate and what to watch next. Even if I had a teeny tiny bit of data on what consumers wanted, I had to gather it myself. If I had it at my fingertips, I know that on the operating side, it can be helpful. So yes, our vision is to do exactly that. We’ve done it with some companies, we try to be as supportive as possible in incorporating this Helio data with things like trends, with figuring out where a price points should be for a new product, with figuring out what geography of company should launch in. So we try to use the data for portfolio companies to find whitespace.

Evan Faber
The money in the investment is valuable. But that takes it to a whole new level because you’re investing in showing a pathway towards the future. So that’s phenomenal. Flipping over to the entrepreneurial side of the equation, you mentioned all of this data you’re collecting, social media, XY and Z. What data streams should the entrepreneur be tracking? What should they be measuring coming to the table?

Aditi Dash
I think that becoming data driven seems like a big thing. But anyone can be data driven. It’s not rocket science. If a founder wants to get data driven, the thing that I would recommend is to pick three metrics on the revenue side and three metrics on the cost side and start looking at them every single day. Any founder, any business can be data driven and data oriented, as long as they’re thinking about sales and profitability consistently, and looking at the same exact metrics. Business, I would say, is not as complicated as it may seem. If you sell something, you make money, so keep track of how many units you’re selling, how much money you’re making, how much that’s costing you. Start there. Don’t overcomplicate it. Start there.

Evan Faber
So, profitability, sales, are definitely quantifiable metrics to track. What about things that can be a little bit more intangible. So the role that the brand plays in this equation, what are some potential metrics that a brand owner or entrepreneur can look at, to measure success?

Aditi Dash
I think that you have to figure out what makes the most sense for your business and category. So for some businesses that are selling through Whole Foods, it’s a whole different set of metrics. And for some other businesses that are selling online, it’s completely different. So once you figure out the story that you want to tell, I think that we ask our businesses that are selling offline to constantly think about velocity metrics, whether it’s units per store per week, or dollars per store per week. And we encourage brands and founders to get creative with the metrics that they’re using to show what makes a difference. So if a brand comes to me and says, we’re different because we have the lowest sugar, then track the sugar content of you and your competitors. If a brand comes to me and says, we’re different because we have a bigger community. In that case, I would say well track user-generated content. How many posts do your consumers create for your brand every day? So I think that things like sales and profitability are easy to start with. Things like online traffic, and Instagram and social following are a good place to go next. But to really start getting into that mindset of how can data help me achieve what I want to do, every statement that a brand says to me, I say, well, how can you support that with data? So I would encourage brands to ask themselves that same question when coming up with these metrics. So we can get into the nuances of all the metrics related to return on adspend or on the online side, or percent spent on trade spend. It just depends on the business, but I really encourage brands to really think about anything that they say, back it up with data.

Evan Faber
Reminds me of a quote Marty Neumeier said that a brand isn’t what you say it is, it is what your consumers say it is. So you’re pretty much saying to go out and make sure that what you’re saying is in line with the market.

Catherine Walsh
You mentioned profitability before. I feel as though that the previous business model has been that companies maybe aren’t so profitable, right? And then they get investment. CPG is so capital intensive, right? It just takes a lot of money to grow. But I also feel as though investors are changing a bit. They may be looking for more profitability when it comes to the brands that they’re investing in, are you seeing that on the Circle Up side as well?

Aditi Dash
Yeah, definitely, I think 2020 specifically has been a big focus. We want brands to have a path to profitability. We’re early stage investors. We’re not expecting companies to be profitable when they raise a series A from a fund like Circle Up. We want to make sure that profitability is a possibility. And the investors that come after us are looking for profitability sooner, so we end up thinking about it sooner. But yes, it’s very capital intensive. And we’ve also seen some brands struggle to grow after they hit a certain point, too, whether that’s something like Casper, which went public, or many of the startups that went out of business. So people I think, have been burned in some scenarios. And so profitability just becomes more important. I always think it’s tougher when a company has raised more money than revenue is generated. So I always get really nervous if a company’s raised $5 million, only to get to a million dollars in sales. I mean, I would think that you could at least turn the 5 million into 5 million in sales, but that’s not always the case.

Catherine Walsh
Right. To build off of Evan’s question regarding branding, I think a lot of entrepreneurs look at investors, and there are a lot of typical questions like what are your sales? How many doors are you in? What is your margin? But I think there’s also a part of it where investors are looking at the value of a brand. When you sit down to evaluate a company, you also have to try to quantify the brand. Is that right? What goes into that?

Aditi Dash
I think that many investors don’t, because it’s hard to quantify a brand. But we do our absolute best to do that quantification of brand or at least spend some time thinking about it. Because a brand is like the essence or soul of a company, and in consumer products, for whatever reason, it does matter. The brand that a company has chosen, and the importance of that brand could lead to flywheel effect. And so what we try to do is quantify that brand best as we can. I think it’s tough to do. But we spent a lot of time looking at, obviously social and things like that. We spend a lot of time looking at and quantifying what consumers say. So we think about what are the top purchase criteria for a brand, and is a brand meeting the needs of consumers. And so there’s no perfect way to quantify brands, it’s really, really hard. And you guys know this better than I do, but I think a place to start is to say, is a company meeting the needs that it’s saying it’s meeting. That’s where we start. If there’s a category like vitamins and supplements, and we see from the data, from the reviews, that consumers mentioned price the most, and that they care most about price, and they want a low price. So then within that category, when we see a brand that says, hey, we are the lowest price or the highest price, we want to make sure that there’s a match. So again, no perfect answer. But we try to use our data platform Helio, especially from a reviews and social perspective, to try to quantify a brand score.

Evan Faber
You mentioned the flywheel effect. Could you go into that a little bit more, I bet there would be some brand owners that would like to hear what are the components of it and what makes a great one? What makes it move?

Aditi Dash
I think the flywheel effect is really, really important. But to be completely candid, I think it’s tougher in consumer, it’s easier to understand the flywheel effect for something like Instagram, because you share a picture, people like that picture. And that is a flywheel. The more pictures you share, the more it’s liked, the more people that like it, the more they want to share their pictures, the more likes their pictures get. And it’s a little bit easier to understand. In consumer, it’s really important to get that same flywheel effect. But a lot of times, it’s hard to identify the consumer that’s actually responsible for the flywheel. So let’s say you create this perfect product for Catherine. It’s THE perfect product for her. If she shares it, she tweets about it, she writes about it, she goes home and sells it, it’s more likely that she just buys it. Comes back to it week after week, tells her friends at dinner parties. So it’s not as viral unless you’re really, really lucky. But the way that I think about the flywheel effect is if I sell one person a product, does that help me effectively use that one person to sell the product to 10 more people? So it kind of expands as you grow. And if I can sell to one Catherine, it doesn’t make it easier for me to sell to Catherine’s friends, if that makes sense.

Evan Faber
Yeah, it does. And that’s often how we’re starting to evolve how we think about the brand. So there’s the customer journey and having messaging and branding strategies for every stage of the customer journey from awareness to conversion, retention, etc. But the flywheel effect, when you’re really selling a branded experience, and not just a product, and you’re getting people talking about it, that’s how we’ve seen a company shift and get that momentum going. So they’re focused on some branded experiences and moving that retention and loyalty and advocacy part of the funnel. So they’re aiming past conversion, to really drive that flywheel part.

Aditi Dash
I think in consumer, most of the time, it takes a little time. So it may be in pack as well. But one way to get your flywheel effect started, is just to do something every single day, for two years. And so just pound the pavement. And it’s really hard. But if you can get out there in front of more people, you have more of a chance to to start this flywheel effect.

Catherine Walsh
How are you seeing trends go right now. Data, of course, is up on supplements, especially immunity products, right? Is there anything else that you’re seeing changing? That’s maybe a little surprising?

Aditi Dash
I think that everything and anything related to stress is on the way up, which isn’t surprising, but makes sense. But it’s still an interesting thing to see. On the surprising side, one thing that’s surprising to me, is that it seems like people are trying to pull back from unnecessary products. And so there’s a trend of simplification. Buying less products. Cutting out the 12-step beauty regime and beauty routine into maybe one step or two steps. So that is a little surprising to me, because in some ways people have more time at home. And so I would have expected that as they are cooking more and spending more time thinking about their day, that there might be more complicated purchases that they were open to making. But there is this desire for simplification. And maybe that’s actually a manifestation of the stress. So as the stress increases, we all only have so much capacity to deal with things. And so maybe one of the first things to go when you start cooking everyday for your family is your 12 step beauty routine? I don’t know, but it was definitely something surprising to me.

Catherine Walsh
Yes, I think you might be onto something there, that interaction between stress and simplifying your life, because in some ways, it’s less simple or in other ways it’s more complicated. So yeah, way more complicated.

Aditi Dash
I also feel like sometimes I see two trends that are totally opposite happening at the same time. That’s always surprising to me. So right now I’m seeing people drink more alcohol. Alcohol sales are up in 2020. But I’m also seeing people with a desire to drink less. And so some brands that are more about non-alc spirits and zero proof, the zero proof movement, those are also gaining steam. And so it’s always interesting to see the two things happening at the same time and think about consumer psychology, and the shift from out-of-home to in-home and thinking about what role does drinking play in our culture? How do we think about that? And so taking a step back, it’s just really interesting to see how our lives are going to evolve. I don’t know if we’re going to go back to crowded bars anytime soon. So I really want to think about that as I think about alcohol investments, for example.

Evan Faber
To that point, it goes back to something you said earlier about consumer needs. And another way that it can be references through Clayton Christensen’s jobs to be done theory, which is what are the underlying jobs that a consumer is hiring brands to do? Because it could be the same job that a consumer is hiring a non-alcoholic beverage and an alcoholic beverage. And so while it’s two conflicting solutions that the consumer has found seemingly, it’s the same underlying job, and there could be other opportunities that brands haven’t met, that connect to that underlying job to be done. So it’s fascinating what you’re bringing up with that example.

Catherine Walsh
And it’s also interesting to hear sober curious. I feel like 2018/2019 sober curious, skus were really ramping up. It’ll be interesting to see how how that fares during 2020 with the rising alcohol sales as well. I think there’s room for both, to be sure. Sober curious products definitely have a foothold now.

Aditi Dash
Yeah, for sure. I think it’s one example of how we use data here at Circle Up. So we started thinking about and talking about the sober curious movement at the beginning of 2019 or late 2018. And have tracked it over time. Seeing different brands get distribution, different brands grow online. This year, we made an investment in a company that’s called Partake Brewing, and their non-alcoholic beers. It’s a trend that we first saw on data and said, is that really a big thing? Then we saw all these other brands launching, and the sales growing and the distribution growing and social growing and more people talking about it, which led us to make an investment. So yes, I am so intrigued by this whole movement of sober curious, I’m really intrigued by trying to figure out how people are going to socialize going forward. I don’t really know.

Evan Faber
Well, that was gonna be the second part of the conversation.

Catherine Walsh
How do you socialize? Trade shows, on a personal level…it’s all upside down right now. I wanted to switch gears for a second. I want to talk about how you have a lot of portfolio companies, you sit on boards. What are the best practices? What are you looking for from a portfolio company in terms of best practices? I’m sure formally, you have certain things like quarterly board meetings, that sort of thing. But what are you really looking for to have a successful relationship with a portfolio company?

Aditi Dash
There’s a lot of stuff published about how to be a good board member. I think there’s less stuff published about how to be a good portfolio company. I think, first and foremost, keep doing what you’re doing, which is growing sales and growing the company. The reason an investor partnered with a company is because there’s something that the investor believes in. So make sure that a company understands the investors thesis, and delivers on that, at least in the near term. So one thing that is helpful for portfolio companies is to ask their investors, hey, can you give me a high level overview or even send me your committee deck of how you positioned the investment into company X. If a founder is running a beverage brand, and the investor said, we are doubling down on your brand because we believe that this is a mass brand. If that’s the case, and you’ve taken money from the investor, then it doesn’t make as much sense to deliver on being a super-premium, high end-brand. So I would say one is understand what the investor put money into you for, then keep delivering on that, at least early on. Give regular updates to an investor. They’re parking money at the business. That does come with formal reporting requirements and formal board meetings. But in addition to fiduciary stuff, I think it’s really important to build a rapport and send weekly if not bi-weekly, or monthly updates. Share problems that you’re coming up with. Investors want to help. They want to be supportive (if you need it). For companies, make sure that like think about what you actually want from your investor. One is money. Two is expertise when you need it. But that means putting in a little bit of work upfront. So if you send, initially, monthly update emails, then it’s just better to build a rapport. And it’s more important to do some of that work early on, then later on.

Catherine Walsh
It’s so important that you bring up both good and bad issues. If you’re a company, and you’re having a tough time with something, you should reach out to your board or your investors to see if maybe someone out there can can help you in some way. You don’t always have to report just on the good things. It’s okay to report on on what’s not working well, because people understand that not everything is going to go well, 100% of the time, right?

Aditi Dash
Yeah, exactly. I think that it’s important to ask for help when things don’t go well. But it’s always a little bit easier to ask for help when things don’t go well, after a period of things have gone well. So if the beginning of a relationship with an investor, as a brand, it’s important to make that investor feel good about the investment that they have made. At most firms, it’s usually one partner that is sticking up for the founder or the brand and spearheading an investment. We’re all people. If somebody invests in your company, make them feel good about investing in it, and little things matter. We try to send a little welcome kit, a package, to the companies we invest in, after we invest. Companies could do the same thing. A welcome to their investors. Send them products to try on the innovation side. A lot of it just comes down to making people feel good. And it doesn’t matter if it’s an investor or anyone else. It’s about how a brand or a company can make somebody feel. So do all those little things, at least at the beginning of an investor portfolio company relationship.

Catherine Walsh
That’s great. And it’s so interesting how you mentioned that there’s usually one partner who’s an advocate for an investment for a brand. Do you then have to persuade the other partners? What’s the dynamic of that? How do you get that done? If you’re the only one out of all the partners who is sticking up for this brand, how does that go?

Aditi Dash
My experience is limited to the few firms I’ve worked at, so I can’t speak for everyone, but yes, at the firms that I’ve worked, sometimes it’s me sticking up for a company and it’s hard because there’s a relationship that a founder and investor has built over a number of years. From a company perspective, it’s important for any company, they should try to get to know multiple partners at a fund. So they can know how different people operate. The way that it works more logistically, is that one partner will convince a general partner to support a deal. And those two will be the board members or board member, board observers of a company if an investment happens, and one or two people or a deal team of up to five, depending on how big the fund is, or how big the company is, it’s their job to answer the diligence questions of the rest of the team. There are scenarios where I’ll want to make an investment so badly, and it won’t get through. I think that it’s as much about making sure that a company fits all of the criteria that a team is looking for. It’s also about making sure I understand what others are looking for in our company, because we operate as a team. At the end of the day, we make joint decisions. Any investor knows that and is okay with it. But from a company side, it can suck sometimes. Because from a company perspective, it’s just tough. If everything is perfect, except for maybe it just doesn’t get through the committee.

Catherine Walsh
It makes sense. We’ve talked about Helio and the human element. How do you find brands? What intrigues you when you find a brand? Is it the branding? Is it the packaging? Is it the entrepreneurs or one thing that usually sticks out at the top of your list?

Aditi Dash
I find brands a few different ways. One is trends that I’m excited about. I’m really excited about stress and anxiety right now, which sounds weird to say. But I think there will be some big brands built in solving stress and anxiety. So I will go to our data platform or ask our data analysts to send me all the brands that are growing in that space. Helio can help me figure out which brands are in that category, and resonating. So that’s one way that I find brands. Another way that I find brands is more, hey, what’s new, what’s new this month, what’s new at Whole Foods, what’s new at Wegmans. Another way that I find brands is looking at what’s really spiking. I look for all the brands that are growing on Instagram, or growing on Facebook or growing online. I try to combine all of those, but the most important thing is to have a thesis behind companies that I reach out to, and companies that I want to build a relationship with. So that’s the answer of how I discover brands.

Evan Faber
On the brand side, again, not all investment is equal. There are many different types of investors out there. What should a brand owner look for when they’re evaluating an investment partner?

Aditi Dash
A brand owner. First of all, the investor has to be aligned with the vision that a brand owner has for his or her company. If a founder wants to grow a company to be a small business, for the rest of time, don’t talk to investors that are about the “go big or go home strategy.” There has to be investor brand fit. Similar to product market fit, there has to be investor brand fit. Different investors look for different things, different things stand out. So some investors are super focused on the branding and the way a product looks or a way of product tastes. Other investors are not focused on that at all. So I think it’s really important to meet the investor that you’re looking for where they stand. So for us at Circle Up, we try not to taste products, because our taste buds are so different. And they’re different from many consumers across the US. We don’t want that to bias our decision. So I usually say no to product samples, but other investors make a big chunk of their decisions based on the taste of a product. So make sure you send the product samples to the investors that want them, not the investors that say, okay, we don’t do tasting, for example. It’s gonna come down to relationship and vibe, but really talk to other founders that a person has invested in. That is the number one piece of advice that is important for brand founders to consider. If you’re in a position where you have the opportunity to work with different kinds of investors, then get some references on your investors. Many times, though, brands aren’t in that position, where it’s not like they have term sheets for investors. If you’re not in the position of hey, I can choose exactly which investor I want to get to, then you need to make sure you understand the downsides of a particular investor and make sure that you are aware of them before going into a relationship.

Catherine Walsh
References are so important in this business for anything– investors, brokers, agencies.

Evan Faber
We have a wildcard question which we do at the end of every episode, out of left field, just to get to know the person a little bit more. Aditi, for you, the question is, what’s the number one thing you invest in yourself to make yourself successful?

Aditi Dash
I always try to do something that helps me build my confidence in one way or another. I think that’s super important. I think it’s really important to know what you’re doing, why you’re doing it, and keep doing it. Just to stay true to your purpose. A few years ago, I signed up for improv classes in New York City, because I knew that getting up on stage would be somehow helpful in building my confidence. So I think it’s really important to invest in yourself and help figure out what one wants to do. I always say investing in confidence is really important. Because it does matter how you say things. It does matter who you say it to. And more importantly, you as an individual know, when you’re not true to yourself. So to me, confidence is just confidence in my ability to do what I want to do.

Evan Faber
Thank you so much for all of the insights that you provided today, one of the last things we do is just a shameless plug. So you can plug Circle Up Growth Partners, whatever you would like to talk about.

Aditi Dash
Appreciate that. I didn’t expect shameless plug time. Circle Up is great. If you’re looking for consumer capital, whether it’s on the equity side or debt side, we’re excited to hear the story. I personally am obsessed with founders that are trying to make a difference in the world, however that might be. Shameless plug for a Moxie Sozo. They’re some of my favorite people in the industry. I love chatting with you guys. I love brainstorming. Shameless plug for anyone who wants to just talk about consumer trends. That is my favorite thing to do. So if anybody wants to do it, please find me on Twitter and or email and you know, let’s talk. All of my handles actually across all social media is Aditi_SF. You can find me on a number of different platforms. If I move from San Francisco, I don’t know what’s gonna happen. But my handle is a Aditi_SF.

Evan Faber
Now you have to stay there. You can’t come back to Colorado!

Aditi Dash
I’m sad about that. I am from Boulder. I grew up there and went to high school there. You guys know this, but just miss it dearly.

Evan Faber
Circle Up is doing amazing things in the investment world. It’s revolutionizing it. It’s bringing a smart approach. I’ve never had a conversation with you all, where I didn’t leave tremendously inspired by the possibilities of how investment can help grow a company and how a data driven approach combined with human intelligence can usher in a new era of smart growth for a lot of companies. So thank you for what you’re doing. And thanks for coming on the show today.

Aditi Dash
Thank you. And thank you guys. I appreciate it!

Published

March 12, 2021

A Special Thanks To

Aditi Dash